Retro dating ads

From colorful Victorian trade cards of the 1870s to the Super Bowl commercials of today, advertising has gone from a small component of everyday life to a ubiquitous presence.

Perhaps the most easily recognizable advertising medium of the late 19th and early 20th centuries is the porcelain sign.

Though most of them are long since gone or have stopped moving, one such billboard of the then Coppertone Girl still stands in Miami Beach — dog, pigtails, swimsuit, and all.

BMW’s have always been about sharp lines and elegant style, and their advertisements are no different.

[Links checked February/10/2017] Porcelain enamel signs originated in Germany and were imported into the U. They quickly became a staple of outdoor advertising across the country.

Around 1900, designers experimented with bold colors and graphics on the signs and they were used to advertise everything from cigarettes and beer to farm equipment and tires.

S., most outdoor signs made between 1890 and and 1950 were constructed of a base of heavy rolled iron, which was die cut into the desired shape, then coated with layers of colored powdered glass and fired in a kiln.

The company became famous in 1959 when it introduced the Coppertone girl, an advertisement showing a young blond topless girl in pigtails staring in surprise as a Boykin Spaniel sneaks up behind her and pulls down her blue swimsuit bottom, revealing her bottom to have a lighter tone than the rest of her body.

Accompanying the ads was the impish slogan, "Don't be a paleface!

These wonderful old ads illustrate how jewelry was worn, when it was made, and how it coordinated with the styles of the time.

Beside each ad is a picture of the jewelry it illustrated.